Breaking The Fast: Quaker’s Life Hack

posted June 04, 2017 at 06:50 pm
by  Joyce Babe Pañares
I love Sunday mornings best. At the crack of dawn, my mother will leave for the market, and return about an hour and a half later with fresh meat and vegetables and all other ingredients she needs for her well-planned menu for the week. The aroma of whatever she has cooked for breakfast would wake me up from my slumber, literally dragging me by the nose from my bed to the dining table.

Some Sundays, she’d serve prawns cooked in garlic and butter along with sinigang na tadyang ng baka. Or salmon head in miso and crabs cooked in 7Up. Rice would always be piping hot, and whenever possible, mom would always buy me my favorite dessert – ripe jackfruit.

Our household of two is, in a way, different when it comes to breaking the fast. Sure, there would be the occasional corned beef or hotdog or seafood cup noodles (but with egg, crab stick and squid balls), but most of the time, our first meal of the day is as heavy as possible. Or as I’d say when I post photos of mom’s dishes on social media: breakfast of champions.

Mix equal amounts of oats and milk in a jar, and top with your favorite fruit – strawberries, blueberries, or apples – for a delicious and healthy breakfast. You can also add peanut butter or chocolate drizzle for a more decadent flavor.
But not everyone has the luxury of time to prepare breakfast every day. For people who are always on the go, breakfast is whatever is their first meal of the day, regardless of whether that meal is served at 8 a.m. or at 12 noon. Others would simply drink coffee and they are good to go.

What people fail to realize is that skipping breakfast and starting the day hungry lead to unhealthy choices. And the adage that “breakfast is the most important meal of the day” is more than just that – it is a scientific fact. Within the first 30 minutes of waking up, it is important to start up your metabolic system with a good meal to get the strength and endurance to go about your day.

Eating oats then becomes the perfect and most convenient fix for people on a constant morning rush.

“A lot of people actually think that oatmeal is hard to prepare. But it’s actually easy to do and is a really convenient and healthy breakfast option. It’s high in fiber and is a good source of protein, vitamins and minerals to give you the energy to start the day and keep you going,” said Anne Remulla-Canda, Quaker’s marketing manager for nutrition.

And with Quaker’s new Overnight Oats, Filipinos now have an even more convenient way to enjoy healthy mornings.

Quaker’s Overnight Oats are convenient for people who are always on the go, such as television and events host Joyce Pring who likes hers topped with sliced apples.
“By preparing your breakfast the night before, there is now no reason to skip the most important meal of the day. Come morning, just grab you jar of Overnight Oats and have a quick breakfast fix at home or at your office. What’s great about it is you can customize it to your taste,”  she added.

For actress Lauren Young, the best part about Overnight Oats is how easy it is to prepare.

 “All you need to know are three steps: place the oats in the jar, soak oats in milk, and add your toppers. That’s it! Pop it in the fridge and you’ll have a nutritious and satiating breakfast that will get you through the busiest mornings,” Young said.

 “It is about finding what you like and making it convenient for you,” Young added.

Model and television host Patti Grandidge said with several choices of fruits all year round, she can have a variety of toppings every day.

“The concept of Overnight Oats is literally a life hack. You can prepare it in under a minute. And with many fruits that are in season, you are assure of a healthy and delicious breakfast,” she said.

So next time you feel like skipping breakfast, grab a jar of Overnight Oats instead and start your morning right. 

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Topics: breakfast , Quaker’s Life Hack , Quaker , Overnight Oats
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