Decorating around a flat screen TV

posted June 22, 2018 at 06:20 pm
by  Manila Standard
You and your living room are happier because you have just acquired a flat screen television. 

FAMILY ROOM.  A line of shelves along the wall above, below, or even across the TV, filled with family photos, plants, antiques, etc., would remind viewers of their life outside the screen world.
But you seem to be having a small problem: everything around the television doesn’t seem to work. The furniture no longer faces the right direction, the wall art is being blocked, and the armoire you’ve placed the television in is too big.   

These are common decorating dilemmas when you buy a flat-screen TV.  

Today, the television has become the focal point for most family rooms. Here are some ideas for placement, surrounding decor, and how to store those unsightly components in a superb way.

Plan for space

One of the advantages of having a flat screen television is the ability to view it from many angles of the room. This same advantage is its disadvantage when it comes to placing furniture in the room.  The challenge is that you can’t have obstacles that are within the line of sight of the television.  Stand back at all angles of the room and assess what furniture is too tall, and plan for space around it. 

Highlight the wall

Your television can blend, or it can be the focal point.  Most people want it to be the focal point as it costs a lot of money, and you want everyone to see it. For you, painting an accent wall that your television is hung, or placed in front of, will draw emphasis to this wall.

SET IT DOWN. Though wall-mounting a flat screen is all the rage, there’s still a whole lot of design mileage to be had from setting your TV down beside an entertainment center, or amid some creative DIY shelving for books, photographs, artworks and trip mementos.

If you are one that would like the television to blend, consider housing your television in a piece of furniture that can be closed, such as an armoire or entertainment center.

Eclectic mix

If your television is just one of the many things you like to look at on the wall, why not add it to a whole eclectic roundup of art pieces? Mount shelves and framed prints on the wall, including photography, watercolors, and funky found frames you can brighten up with a vibrant color. Then, add on the TV as if the square shape is just another piece of work to fit into the mix.

Fresh Frames

Most modern televisions are placed at a focal point in the living or family room. Mount a sharp-looking frame around the screen to lend your favorite teleserye a touch of class. Add a coat of paint to the frame to brighten up the black screen during off hours. You can even hit antique shops for a weathered frame.

Hidden TV

Maybe you don’t use the television often. Or, you want it out of the way to encourage conversation. Perhaps you just don’t like the look of a giant black square on the wall. To solve each of these design problems, you can mount a panel on sliding doors to obscure your TV while you’re not binge-watching your favorite Netflix show. You can also recess the television into the wall and mount a photo on a hinge to hide it.

Shelving surround

If built-in isn’t in your budget, lots of home stores sell modular shelving that you can build around your own custom entertainment center design. With this solution, you can fill the space with more than just a black box, adding in some color and personality with books, art, found objects, and plants.

Second fiddle

CREATIVE POSITIONING. A television next to a matching wall-mounted shelf and console unit reduces the visual prominence of the screen.
Don’t be afraid to make the television a minor player in the room. This family room is used for more than just watching TV, so the set is tucked away in the corner where they can pull up a chair and watch whenever they’d like without the technology dominating the room when guests are over, and conversation is flowing. 

Topics: living room , flat screen television , entertainment , design
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