Past & Present

posted January 19, 2018 at 07:59 pm
by  Manila Standard
What started as a one auto-truck fleet eventually became a pillar of the Southern Tagalog economy in 1929. By the 70s, the company expanded its services to the Eastern Visayas region. By the 80s, it expanded into ferry operations. It was in 1984 that the company formally changed its name to Philtranco Service Enterprises, Inc.

Philtranco was established in 1914 by two Americans, Albert Louis Ammen and Max Blouse who, together, formed Al Ammen Transport Company or ALATCO – the first bus operator in the Philippines as well as in Asia. 
Today, Philtranco has a growing fleet of 250 buses that range from deluxe, premium deluxe, to executive seater bus transport services. It has forged partnerships with Jam Liner and FastCat, to provide not only an alternative to air travel but also offer a more diverse passenger experience.

Philtranco to Pampanga

One of the popular routes covered by Philtranco is the Culinary Capital of the Philippines that is Pampanga. 

Anyone who loves to eat and travel knows that Pampanga is a melting pot of sights and cultures. This province is home to well-loved local dishes like the sisig, tocino, and morcon, and even, to more exotic specialties like betute (frogs) or camaru (crickets). Likewise, it is an adventure’s paradise what with destinations like Mount Pinatubo, Nayong Pilipino, and numerous water and adventure parks!

Truly, more than just providing a means of transportation, Philtranco makes the Philippines more accessible. As the oldest bus company operator in both the country and in Asia, Philtranco continues to connect Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao with its same company vision of “Byaheng Masaya, Serbisyong Subok Na.”

Topics: Philtranco Service Enterprises , Inc
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